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Image from the collection titled "Making Pottery at Kwilu" taken by Robert E. Smith in the 1960s.  It shows a woman kneeling over a clay bowl she is sculpting with her hands.

Africa Focus: Sights and Sounds of a Continent

Review
By using the search filters effectively, teachers can have students compare and contrast various images of worship, schooling, work, and landscapes to highlight the vast cultural and ecological diversity of Africa.
Photograph of a Goudiry Woman and Children

Africa Online Digital Library

Review
The site’s stated goal is the implementation of emerging best practices in the “American digital library community” in an African context, and it does not disappoint. Indeed, the site demonstrates a rare combination of scholarly sophistication, ease of use, and broad appeal.
Image of Africa

Africa Past & Present Podcast

Review
The podcast could serve as a useful tool for Africa experts to stay up-to-date on scholarship, for professors in other areas to broaden their knowledge of Africa and establish relevant connections, and for students to engage in analysis of “texts” beyond the written word.
The image is a detail from the a photo titled "Boys at Boubon, Niger 1992" from Gallery 5 of the site.  It shows three Nigerian boys posing for a picture.

Africa Speaks: West African University Students Write About Their Lives

Review
The great strength of Africa Speaks is the honest and unfiltered voices of the Nigerien students. Rather than being described and defined by journalists, scholars, and other outsiders, they speak for themselves about the experience of growing up in a developing and politically unstable African country during the 1970s and 1980s.
Poster for solidarity with South Africa features a profile of a face with an outline of Africa

African Activist Archive

Review
This archive serves as a general reference place for primary sources, as well as a starting point for focused research projects into specific organizations, as well as examinations on how activism is documented.
Ptolemy's Map displays a out of proportion western Europe, Mediterranean, and North Africa.

Analyzing Maps

Methods

The map is one of the oldest forms of nonverbal communication. Humans were probably drawing maps before they were writing texts. Mapmaking may even predate formal language. As far as historians and geographers can determine, every culture in every part of the world uses and makes maps. This deep lineage reflects the descriptive usefulness of a map—a map is one of the best proofs that a “... Read More »

Museum exhibit showing Alaska in text with artifacts surrounding it.

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center

Review
This website provides links to lesson plans based on exhibits, as well as images from the museum’s collection that may not otherwise be available to visitors.

Biblioteca Digital Hispánica (Hispanic Digital Library)

Review
...the Biblioteca Digital Hispánica is a well-organized, highly searchable, and remarkable platform for a wide audience, including instructors, students, researchers, and the general public. Historians interested in Spain’s cross-cultural encounters in Europe, Asia, and the Americas will particularly benefit from this resource.

Brazilian Carriage

Source

This horse-drawn carriage dates from the late-eighteenth or early nineteenth century. During this period, carriages like this were the preferred form of transportation for elite members of society. It protected them from inclement weather and created a spectacle among the rest of the townspeople who saw them ride by. To reflect their high social position, the individuals who rode in carriages... Read More »

Cast of the Hand of Brazilian Emperor Pedro II

Source

Brazilian Emperor Pedro II ruled from 1831 – 1889. He was the last emperor in power before Brazil became a republic. This image captures two bronze hand molds taken of Pedro II’s right hand in the early nineteenth century. The one on the left was taken by Marc Ferrez, and the one on the right was created by Antonio Joaquim de Azevedo. Both feature a ring that Pedro II wore on his index finger... Read More »

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